Helping Kids and Parents Understand Writing Notebook Rubrics

I recently wrote about wanting to encourage a playful spirit in the writer’s notebook, but also about my expectation that my 6th graders write words. Lots of words. It can be hard to feel like I’m being clear about what I think should be happening in students’ notebooks in order for them to become stronger and more confident writers, and to have lots of raw material for making things outside of their notebooks.

With help from colleagues and a couple of parents, we created this rubric for our 6th graders: CopyofGr6WNBRubricV3 It’s still being revised a little at a time, but this is our current version.

The rubric itself is not that helpful unless we all agree on what certain terms mean, such as “thoughtful and/or reflective.” In order to make sure that our other 6th grade Humanities teacher and I were approaching this the same way, we looked at students’ notebooks together. When we were ready, we then made a slideshow for kids to walk them through what it looks like to meet or exceed expectations in some key areas of the rubric.

Gr6 Understanding the Writer’s Notebook Rubric

When students got their first rubrics of the year, they were all able to understand their feedback, and work with me to set personal goals for themselves as writers.

The Sub Sandwich Problem

ImageMelissa, my math coteacher and sometimes partner in executing the Learning Plan, came in and told us about a field day she had helped organize at her school last year. There were a lot of kids, and groups of them all wanted to have their lunches in different parts of the park. Without time to really think very hard, she had to divide up the sandwiches among the groups. She did the best she could, but some of the kids came and complained afterward that the allocations hadn’t been fair. We asked our kids, “Were they right? Did Melissa mess up?” Continue reading