Kika’s Historical Fiction

One of my students from last year wrote this amazing story in her 5th grade study of Human Rights. They chose a Human Rights issue, researched it, designed a presentation, and wrote a historical fiction piece. This is her first draft. To see how one of my former students has continued her journey as a writer is so amazing. It also turns out she’s one of my future students, since I’ll be teaching 6th grade next year.

Enjoy!

Yuki looked like a wild horse, galloping through the streets of the small, friendly town, her silky black hair flying through the wind.  The glaring sun beamed down at her.

“Japan bombed Pearl Harbor!” she screamed. “Japan bombed Pearl Harbor!” Continue reading

The Sub Sandwich Problem

ImageMelissa, my math coteacher and sometimes partner in executing the Learning Plan, came in and told us about a field day she had helped organize at her school last year. There were a lot of kids, and groups of them all wanted to have their lunches in different parts of the park. Without time to really think very hard, she had to divide up the sandwiches among the groups. She did the best she could, but some of the kids came and complained afterward that the allocations hadn’t been fair. We asked our kids, “Were they right? Did Melissa mess up?” Continue reading

The Pentomino Proof

IMG_4991My students enjoy talking about their ideas about books, about their writing, about new content we’ve been studying in Social Studies, and about math concepts. They question one another and listen to each other’s thoughts and strategies.

So why do the words, “Show your thinking,” instill dread and angst?

A wise staff developer once told me, “When we have questions about practice, it always comes back to purpose. What’s your purpose?”

Continue reading